Annual Report 2018/19

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Company Overview

TAS works with the leaders and practitioners who plan, commission and deliver health and social care.

We are a professional services organisation, providing a range of strategic, advisory and programme management services to the health sector. We bring together sector experts with data analysis and health system insights, supporting our customers to make informed decisions and improve service planning and delivery.

In everything we do, we’re focused on achieving our 2020 vision - supporting our partners to deliver the best healthcare for all New Zealanders.

 

Leveraging our Expertise

Working across the breadth of the health system gives us a unique perspective. We’re leveraging our collective expertise in the areas we know we can have the greatest impact. These areas include:

  • Growing sector collaboration

  • Data analysis, insights and strategy

  • Efficient, effective programme management

  • Building capability through education and training

  • Trusted, independent advice.

Delivering our Strategic Objectives

Through our expertise, we can deliver our strategic objectives:

Delivering value to the sector

  • Getting closer to our customers

  • Ensuring our processes deliver a high quality, consistent customer experience

  • Continually building the capability of our TAS people.

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Who we work with

The six Central Region District Health Boards (DHBs) are our shareholders. Through our work we partner with New Zealand’s 20 DHBs, the Ministry of Health (MoH) and a wide range of stakeholders across the health and social care sectors including:

  • Government organisations

  • Sector bodies and representatives

  • Iwi

  • Non-government organisations (NGOs)

  • Health workforce and service providers.

  • Aged residential care providers

  • Primary health organisations (PHOs)

  • Unions

  • Professional associations and clinical groups

 
 

Singapore health authorities visited TAS and interRAI Services during March 2019 to learn about how we use the interRAI assessment tool in the healthcare of older people.

- Singaporean Delegation, join Graham Smith, TAS Chief Executive and interRAI staff

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 Key Achievements

We are proud to present key achievements from the past year that
are moving TAS towards realising our 2020 vision.


HIGHLIGHTS OF OUR WORK

TAS is committed to enhancing value for our customers to enable them to deliver the best
healthcare for all New Zealanders. The following highlights profile TAS’ role as a key strategic partner and enabler to the sector achieving its goals.

INCREASE IN MAORI PARTICIPATION IN THE HEALTH WORKFORCE

  • 20 DHB CE commitment to taking tangible actions to increase Maori participation in the health workforce, underpinned by the position statement developed by Te Tumu Whakarae on Maori workforce.

INTEGRATED COMMUNITY PHARMACY SERVICES AGREEMENT (ICPSA)

  • Delivery of the new evergreen Integrated Community Pharmacy Services Agreement (ICPSA) on 1 October 2018, which includes greater ability for DHBs to commission local services to meet population need, address equity and support delivery of the Government’s Pharmacy Action Plan. Includes over 1000 community pharmacies, accounting for around $472 million.

ESTABLISHMENT OF PAY EQUITY UNIT

  • Establishment of the pay equity unit and development of a process to respond to claims covering 87% of the health workforce.

REGIONAL EQUITY FRAMEWORK

  • Development of a regional equity framework for Central Region DHBs.

AGED RESIDENTIAL CARE (ARC) FUNDING MODEL REVIEW

  • Management of the Aged Residential Care (ARC) Funding Model Review sponsored by DHBs and MoH, undertaken by Ernst & Young.

REGIONAL DIGITAL HEALTH SERVICES (RDHS)

  • Set up of the Regional Digital Health Service (RDHS), formerly called Regional Health Informatics Programme (RHIP).

DATA ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH REPORT

  • Data analysis and research report produced by TAS and championed by the Health System Performance-Insights programme (HSP-I) for DHBs to better understand the pressures caused by acute demand (unplanned hospital admissions). Report provided performance insights to help DHBs pinpoint opportunities to improve their acute demand flow.

 ORGANISATION PERFORMANCE

Our key performance results reflect our continuing work to build a sustainable and high
performing organisation.

 
 

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New Investment
Funding increases or investment for new work programmes or projects

2017/18

3M

2016/17

2.8M


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Customer Advocacy
Customers who would recommend TAS

2017/18

58%

2016/17

47%



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Customer Satisfaction
New measure, respondents rated TAS services 7+/10
 

2017/18

79%

2016/17

-


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People Engagement
Staff Engagement Index
 

2017/18

68.3%

2016/17

68.4%


 
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Chief Executive Report

It’s been a big year for TAS. We’ve developed our operating model to set TAS uo to deliver on our future aspirations: to grow the value we deliver, and to build a resilient, agile organisation that’s a great place to work. 

A key part of this was embarking on a 2020 programme to invest in our people and culture. We set defined change aims that resulted in a new TAS people strategy, culture strategy, and a refreshed IT security model, architecture and framework.

This past year we have achieved some meaningful results alongside our health sector partners on national and regional work programmes. This includes the delivery of the new evergreen Integrated Community Pharmacy Services Agreement (ICPSA), management of the Aged Residential Care (ARC) Funding Model Review, development of a regional equity framework for Central Region DHBs, and the implementation of a Stroke Clot Retrieval Service, among many other positive initiatives. The case studies throughout this Annual Report show these programmes are creating lasting impact.

As a reflection of our past programme successes, we are pleased the DHB CEs and DHB Executive Governance Group have endorsed our 2019/20 National and Regional Work Plans, enabling our progress for the next 12 months.

Earlier this year, we were honoured to receive double accreditation by Joint Accreditation System of Australia and New Zealand (JASANZ) and Accreditation Audit by International Health Accreditation Organisation (ISQua). ISQua assessed our TAS Certification Audit Programme as exceptional for its processes and systems, noting the strategy and vision are deeply implemented throughout TAS.

In April 2019, we also celebrated two years of Front+Centre, our meeting venue that provides space for health sector stakeholders and external customers to hold important discussions and shape ideas.

In looking forward, I am excited for the many initiatives we have underway at TAS to cement our strong organisational values of Integrity, Professionalism, Courage and Aspiration. To that end, we are evolving our cultural competencies through the establishment of a Maori Strategy Steering Group in partnership with our Maori staff group (Te Roopu Maori o TAS) to develop our Tikanga and Te Reo Maori.

I’d like to thank Murray Bain, our Board Chair, and our dedicated Board members and staff for their commitment to helping our partners deliver the best healthcare for all New Zealanders, now and in future.


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Chair Report

At TAS we are committed to helping our customers deliver the best healthcare they can for all New Zealanders. At the heart of our role as strategic partner and enabler to the health sector, are the strong partnerships and collaboration we build with our customers.

Our conference and meeting venue has enabled these partnerships to thrive. Leaders, clinicians and health professionals regularly come together at Front+Centre to shape ideas that collectively help us progress our country’s health priorities.

TAS has forged a new direction over the last year, including forming a Services Group and Insights and Analytics Group to optimise how we work across the business.

We’ve created a Centre of Excellence with increased capability across our people, technology and processes - to more effectively take advantage of evolving data analytics. By harnessing our data resources, we have enhanced the value of health insights we provide across our customer base. This puts us in the best position to offer expert advice and services that benefit health and social care in New Zealand.

Perceptions of quality outcomes, customer advocacy, customer satisfaction and the value that TAS provides are fundamental to our reputation and success as an organisation - nationally and globally.

In the last year we enjoyed hosting overseas visitors who had heard about TAS’ work with out health partners and wanted to gain knowledge about our service model and expertise.

One group included Singaporean health authorities who visited during March to learn about how we use the interRAI assessment tool in the healthcare of older people. These visits have expanded the exchange of ideas between TAS and our neighbouring counterparts and are the type of collaboration we aim to continue over the coming year.

To conclude, I’d like to welcome two exceptional new Board members to the table. Sir Paul Collins and Catherine Law are already bringing their wealth of experience to the fore. I’d also like to thank my fellow Board members, Chief Executive Graham Smith, Board Secretary Jane Doherty, the TAS management team and staff for their support over what has been a significant twelve months for TAS.

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- Speakers and DHB representatives at the national OIA workshop

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 Key Programme Achievements

TAS core services are focused on facilitating key national and regional work programmes on behalf of New Zealand’s DHBs and the MoH. In 2018/19, we worked with our DHB and MoH partners and broader sector stakeholders to deliver key achievements across the following programmes of work.


EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS

  • Established the pay equity unit and developed process to respond to claims covering 87% of the health workforce.

  • Led the DHBs’ response to the MBIE Labour Inspectorate Holidays Act compliance requirements and pay equity claims, in partnership with NZ Council of Trade Unions (CTU) and other health unions.

  • Positive engagement with the 20 DHBs, including development of employment relations (ER) capacity and capability within DHBs through inclusion of ER/HR DHB staff in national MECA bargaining.

SAFE STAFFING HEALTHY WORKPLACES (SSHW)

  • The CCDM software was constantly improved to enable DHBs to achieve greater traction with their full-time equivalent (FTE) calculations. The development of a roster testing pool provided DHBs with a rigorous method for managing rosters.

  • Operationalised core data set (CDS) with great examples from at least two DHBs on how they operationalised the CDS. One DHB hosted webinars with the developer (Qlik) for the sector, to share their CDS journey and key Care Capacity Demand Management (CCDM) learnings.

COMMUNITY PHARMACY

  • Delivered the new evergreen Integrated Community Pharmacy Services Agreement (ICPSA) on 1 October 2018, which includes greater ability for DHBs to commission local services to meet population need, address equity and support delivery of the Government’s Pharmacy Action Plan. Includes over 1000 community pharmacies, accounting for around $472 million annually.

  • Established the National Annual Agreement Review process, which aligns with the Primary Care and Age-Related Residential Care annual review processes.

 WORKFORCE PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

  • 20 DHB CE commitment to taking tangible actions to increase Maori participation in the health workforce, underpinned by the position statement developed by Te Tumu Whakarae on Maori workforce.

  • Developed nursing graduate costing model to quantify the costs for DHBs of employing additional nursing graduates as part of the Nursing Accord.

  • Wellbeing project partnership now includes Ministry of Health’s (MoH) Clinical Cluster to ensure a multi-professional approach to wellbeing, along with the Health Sector Relationship Agreement (HSRA).

Members of our workforce planning and development team

Members of our workforce planning and development team

ELECTRONIC ORAL HEALTH RECORD

  • Completed the planning phase and commenced implementation.

AIR AMBULANCE

  • Established the DHB Air Ambulance Steering Group and projects to support DHBs and MoH to roll out new contractual arrangements to implement inter-hospital transfers by Air Ambulance.

 
Electronic Oral Health Record dental stakeholders

Electronic Oral Health Record dental stakeholders

 

HEALTH OF OLDER PEOPLE

ORAL HEALTH

  • Used design thinking to prototype an oral health analytics dashboard with DHB portfolio managers, clinicians, provider and adolescent oral health coordinators. This work is completed with biannual analysis and reporting for the stakeholder to be able to make informed decisions on oral health for adolescent services.

  • Analysed the triannual New Zealand Dental Association fees survey to help DHB customers put forward a successful price increase for 2019/20.

 
interRAI Education & Support and Software Services teams

interRAI Education & Support and Software Services teams

 

interRAI


MENTAL HEALTH AND ADDICTION

  • Facilitated the establishment of a Partnership Group focused on six key issues impacting mental health and addiction Non-Government Organisation (NGO) providers with a national focus.

  • Established a training support fund for support workers in mental health and addition with a view to having 80% of support workers at level 4 NZQA or equivalent within a two-year timeframe.

REGIONAL SERVICES PLAN (RSP)

  • DFHDH


REGIONAL DIGITAL HEALTH SERVICES

PRIMARY CARE

  • DHHDH


AUDIT AND ASSURANCE

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HEALTH SYSTEM PERFORMANCE INSIGHTS

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- Colleagues in our Tory Street office coming together on Pink Shirt for anti-bullying

 
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 Strategic Objectives

 
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Delivering Value to the Sector

TAS has a strong focus on continuous improvement to ensure we keep adding value to our customers and the sector. 

 
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Over the last year we’ve been providing value to our customers through four key areas:

 

Delivering
greater health system analysis and insights

Growing
sector people capability via our workforce team

Improving
service efficiency and effectiveness

Fostering
partnerships and collaboration

 

We’ve developed our operating model to set TAS up to deliver on our future aspirations to grow the value we deliver, and to build a resilient, agile organisation that’s a great place to work.

In a move to drive better consistency and bring our collective expertise together, we formed the Services Group and Insights and Analytics Group. With our services aligned, we shifted our focus to work smarter, so we can provide more for our customers.

“With our customers at the forefront of our work, we’re not only optimising how we work now but we’re looking to the future; growing new business and developing new services to have greater impact and add benefit back to the health sector” - Graham Smith, TAS Chief Executive


Strategic Objective

 

Getting closer to our customers

Partnering with our customers to enable them to reach their goals is at the heart of our business.

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CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

Strong partnerships and collaboration with our customers are the cornerstone of our business, enabling us to help them deliver the best healthcare for all New Zealanders.

Every year we formally measure how well we are delivering against customer expectations through our annual customer satisfaction survey. This year’s survey examined four key areas: perceptions of TAS, customer satisfaction, customer advocacy and our value proposition.

Survey respondents covered District Health Boards, primary care and other health sector organisations in a variety of roles from chief executives and board members to portfolio managers, and operational and clinical staff.

 
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PERCEPTIONS

Perceptions of TAS remain positive (the trend shows customers agree'/strongly agree with positive perception statements).

The highest rated areas are related to professionalism of relationships and quality services/advice.

VALUE ATTRIBUTES

This year our survey explored key areas of value that TAS provides to customers. We tested how important these areas of value were to customers and asked them to rate our performance.

 
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There is a continued strong correlation between importance and performance. This indicates that the areas where TAS is performing the best are also areas which are most important to our customers.

Strategic Objective

 

Innovating smart business processes

To enable us to evolve and grow we need to invest in and strengthen the foundations on which TAS operates.

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TRANSFORMING OUR BUSINESS AND THE WAY WE WORK

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MIGRATION TO WINDOWS 10


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Strategic Objective


 

Growing our people

We’re committed to growing innovative, trusted, expert advisors who love what they do and make a difference.

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BUILDING OUR CULTURE

2018-2019 has been an important year for growing TAS people and culture. We built on the earlier role-modelling we’d done of our TAS values (aspiration, integrity, courage and professionalism) and moved into how we approach our work. We then embarked on a 2020 programme to invest in our people and personal growth.

 
Celebrating our great team culture

Celebrating our great team culture

Getting those steps in with Move it March

Getting those steps in with Move it March

 

Our change aims were:

  • New leadership framework and ways of working

  • Leadership for our Services Group

  • Operating model for Data and Analytics service

  • Learning Management System

  • IT roadmap

  • Capability mapping

  • People and culture strategies

  • Quick win initiatives.

What we achieved:

  • TAS People Strategy developed

  • TAS Culture Strategy developed

  • New leadership framework and ways of working developed

  • IT Security model, architecture and framework refreshed

  • New purpose, direction and operation model for Services Group and Data and Analytics service developed and teams set up

  • IT roadmap finalised

HEALTH, SAFETY AND WELLNESS

Our health, safety and wellness (HSW) committee, made up of representatives from each business unit, meet regularly to foster and monitor positive health and safety practices in the organisation.

A monthly report on HSW activities, issues and incidents is presented to the TAS Board so that it can ensure TAS is meeting its obligations under the Health and Safety at Work Act.

 

- TAS Chief Executive Graham Smith and the Audit and Assurance team with ISQua auditors

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Our TAS Values

Our values of aspiration, integrity, courage and professionalism are a core part of how we approach our work at TAS. In 2017/18 we developed how we were sharing these values with our people. Visual representation of the values were created and we refined how we described them based on input from our teams. 

We also launched a new Living the Values award to encourage and recognise staff who are role modelling the values.

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Building our culture

As part of the operating model review we held workshops with our teams to explore the current and desired TAS culture. This helped us understand the parts of our organisation culture that we value and want to carry forward into the future, and identified elements that our people wanted to develop for future.

Elements for development:

  • Customer focused

  • Shared and unified TAS approach to work

  • Accountable and transparent about our efforts

  • Valuing and encouraging diversity

  • Working as partners with our stakeholders and customers

  • Strong sense of community and connectedness – friendly and caring

  • Supporting innovation, learning and growth and celebrating success.


Health, Safety and Wellness

Our health, safety and wellness committee is made up of representatives from each business unit. They meet regularly to monitor health and safety processes and initiatives in the organisation.

Risks
The main risks for TAS staff are discomfort, pain or injury from computer use, risks around working alone for our remote staff and managing contractor risks.

Key achievements over the last year

  • A SafePlus Assessment

  • First Aid Course run on site for staff

  • Purchase of a defibrillator (it is also included on the defib app)

  • Events organised to encourage activity - Active April and Step’tember

  • Proactive health initiatives such as free flu vaccinations

  • Ergonomic workstation set ups and assessments.

The SafePlus report made a number of recommendations which TAS is incorporating into a more comprehensive health, safety and wellness strategy.


 

- Front+Centre team celebrating second birthday milestone

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Setting a good example: extending a maternal mental health model to eating disorders

It’s been a big year in the Mental Health and Addiction sector. A national enquiry into mental health, new Substance Addiction legislation and renewed media and public attention, meant staff worked extra hard to deliver projects, on top of their everyday work. One project in the central region, reviewing a clinical network approach in maternal mental health, led to thinking about how this could be applied to other areas, including helping people with the experience of eating disorders. 

Project members John Zonnevylle, Jade Walker, Tracey McIntyre and Emma Thompson (pictured left to right)

Project members John Zonnevylle, Jade Walker, Tracey McIntyre and Emma Thompson (pictured left to right)

John Zonnevylle, Operations Manager responsible for the maternal mental health team and central region eating disorder team, says the team wanted to improve service delivery for people with the experience of eating disorders. ‘We knew the maternal mental health care model was similar, in that we support regional partner DHBs, who in turn support women and babies in their local area. We wanted to take those learnings, and apply them in a different way. Our aim is for people experiencing eating disorders to get the best possible treatment in their local area, and only need to use the tertiary service in Wellington when absolutely required.’

’The great work done by Jade Walker, Tracey McIntyre and the Specialist Maternal Mental Health Team has provided us with a good template to guide further developments.’

A regional co-ordinator had been put in place for the specialist maternal mental health service, to provide education and training to local services, improving and enhancing care for mothers before and after giving birth. Where a mother had a high level of distress, the central region opted to keep services in her own home and community.

A group of clinical leads and service leads supported by TAS, identified that the Central Region Eating Disorders service (CREDS) could benefit from a similar solution.

Josh Palmer, Planning and Improvement Manager at TAS says ‘The maternal mental health service gave us a template, so now we’re able to perform a clear gap analysis. We can see what we need, and where we need to go. We know that CREDS could benefit from having another staff member skilled in education co-ordination, and facilitating connections across the region.’

John Zonnevylle reiterates this. ‘Unless you carve out time for education and support, people in clinical roles struggle to do it. Having a dedicated role has been one of the keys to success for the specialist maternal team.’

John says ‘TAS’ support was integral to driving forward the project. TAS staff highlighted the opportunity to use our learning, and were a sounding board for defining our thinking. They gave us their full support. Time remained a challenge throughout the process, and we needed simple determination and perseverance to move to success.’

TAS staff highlighted the opportunity to use our learning, and were a sounding board for defining our thinking. They gave us their full support.

John Zonnevylle

 
 

Caring for older people: A case for better data

A series of workshops around the country are bringing together key players in the Aged Residential Care sector, and helping aged care facilities learn more about their residents.

Aged residential care managers at a workshop use interRAI data to learn more about their residents.

Aged residential care managers at a workshop use interRAI data to learn more about their residents.

John McDougall, Data Analyst at the New Zealand Aged Care Association (NZACA), is an advocate of bringing people together to learn more about interRAI – assessments that take place to fully understand an older person needs and plan their care.

interRAI assessors, often Registered Nurses, complete a comprehensive clinical assessment with an older person. This forms the basis of a care plan to support someone in their own home or when they need to go into residential care.

John says Given that NZACA was supportive of the introduction of interRAI (which became mandatory for aged care facilities in 2015), we were dismayed that many of our members were finding it a burden. We wanted to ensure aged care facility managers understood how to use interRAI more efficiently, and get through the assessment process quickly.’ 

The NZACA was keen to collaborate with TAS in delivering a series of workshops for aged residential care staff.

‘The workshops are a joint venture between TAS and the NZACA. interRAI educators – a service provided by TAS - do the training and teaching at the workshops. I’m involved as an NZACA representative,’ John says.TAS facilitators deliver the presentation, working through how health professionals can maximise the value from interRAI, make better use of interRAI data and learn more about their residents. interRAI data provides a picture of the individual person’s needs and where services could improve function, slow rate of decline or help symptoms. The workshops bring together people who have the common goal of caring for older people, and allow them to put a face to a name, and establish new points of contact.

Sandra Deegan, Facility care manager/Registered Nurse at Cottage Rest Home in Opunake says the workshops helped her feel part of something bigger. ‘It was great to network with others, and realise you’re not alone – you’re not the only one going through something.’

‘At the workshop I learned that interRAI reports can be printed off monthly. I now spend one day a month downloading the reports and giving the information to the trust who governs our rest home.’ 

We wanted to ensure aged care facility managers understood how to use interRAI more efficiently, and get through the assessment process quickly.

John McDougall

 
 
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New contract for pharmacy services centres on people

A new contract for community pharmacy services marks a turning point in providing integrated pharmacy services to our communities.

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The new contract will support delivery of a key government health strategy – the Pharmacy Action Plan. It puts people at the centre of services, and envisions a healthcare system where pharmacists are skilled medicine advisors, working with other health professionals to achieve the best health outcomes for people.

To get the contract over the line, TAS supported DHBs in extensive consultation and engagement with community pharmacy owners, pharmacy sector groups, health and consumer groups. Carolyn Gullery, Lead GM Planning and Funding for Pharmacy, says ‘TAS was there every step of the way. TAS worked with legal advisors, provided meeting secretariat support and liaised with sector representatives.'

 

The road to success

The genesis of the new contract was in 2015, when DHBs wanted to take a different approach to pharmacy, in line with the New Zealand Health Strategy and Pharmacy Action Plan.

The consultation process began in 2017. DHBs held roadshows across the country from March to April 2018 along with two national hui. People shared their views via an online survey, and TAS grouped feedback from 1100 valid consultation survey responses.

Rachel McKay, Community Pharmacy Services Programme Director at TAS, says a turning point in the process was the decision to use Buddle Findlay as the legal advisors for the contract.

‘Buddle Findlay have worked on other significant DHB service contracts, meaning our stakeholders had confidence that the pharmacy contract could work in practice. Having the same legal advisors working across contracts also supports developing integrated services in the future’.

 

What’s changed?

The new contract, called the Integrated Community Pharmacy Services Agreement, is a step towards pharmacists working in more integrated ways with other healthcare providers, like GPs.

‘As well as working in community pharmacies, pharmacists could be working alongside other health professionals in local communities to deliver more integrated services for consumers, in health care centres, on marae, or even in people’s homes. We want to make the dispensing function more efficient, and enable pharmacists to spend more time talking with patients, and make more use of their clinical expertise in medicines management,’ Rachel says.

 

What’s next?

While parts of the contract are nationally consistent, it also allows for more localised services, and for pharmacists to work with other health professionals to better respond to local community needs. Carolyn Gullery says that TAS will continue to provide support to DHBs, and be instrumental in sharing learnings across DHBs, going forward. The new contract will take effect from 1 October 2018.

As well as working in community pharmacies, pharmacists could be working alongside other health professionals in local communities to deliver more integrated services for consumers, in health care centres, on marae, or even in people’s homes.

Rachel McKay

 
 
 

Attracting the right kind of talent: Kiwi Health Jobs

Every month, around 30,000 people visit kiwihealthjobs.co.nz to look for their next health role. Introduced in 2011, Kiwi Health Jobs is a key recruitment tool for the 20 DHBs and the NZ Blood Service - and it is paying dividends through cheaper advertising and a growing pool of talent applying for health sector roles. The website also has a critical role to play in finding candidates for hard-to-fill roles, like midwifery. 

Kiwi Health Jobs is a key recruitment tool for DHBs to source health professionals.

Kiwi Health Jobs is a key recruitment tool for DHBs to source health professionals.

Martin Price, National Chairperson on behalf of the General Managers, Human Resources (GMs HR), says that collaboration is key to the success of Kiwi Health Jobs. ‘Each of the 20 DHBs pool their resources and act in unison. It only costs $26.00 on average to place a recruitment ad on the Kiwi Health Jobs website, in contrast to $150.00 on average for a job ad on a commercial job website.’ 

Over the past year, TAS co-ordinated continuous improvements to Kiwi Health Jobs, collaborating with DHB recruitment representatives and general managers of HR to keep the site fresh and relevant. One of these improvement initiatives was to integrate the website with existing job feeds.

Kiwi Health Jobs now has direct linkage with leading commercial job sites and is working to develop a link with jobs.govt.nz, saving recruiters time and money.

‘We’re able to take our advertisements even further than before,’ Martin Price says. ‘Through the direct link with other job boards, we’re growing Kiwi Health Jobs’ reach. To run a successful jobs website, you need to be big, and get lots of relevant candidates to come and see you. The more job adverts you have, the more candidates you attract. It’s a virtuous circle.’ 

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Fifty-seven percent of visitors access the site from New Zealand, but Kiwis aren’t the only ones looking for health sector roles. Twenty-three percent of site visitors come from the UK, US and Australia. 

‘The programme team identified at-risk occupations in New Zealand and globally, where there are significant skills shortages,’ Martin says. ‘These roles – such as sonographers, midwives and psychiatrists – are hard to fill and will be for years to come.’

The programme team is taking a proactive approach to recruit people in these roles.

‘In the UK, we’re piloting advertising to reach potential candidates in hard-to-fill roles, and attract them to come to New Zealand. It’s a long-term process, too – it starts right back at university level, when people decide to go into these careers.’

Martin and the team have high hopes for the future. ‘If Kiwi Health Jobs continues to be a success, we’ll be able to significantly expand our international presence, and help fill these at-risk roles. This will have flow-on effects and will benefit the New Zealand health system.’

Each of the 20 DHBs pool their resources and act in unison. We’re able to take our advertisements even further than before.

Martin Price

 
 
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